Resources and Links

Diesel Emissions Reduction – General

The Office of Transportation and Air Quality (OTAQ) has submitted three Reports to Congress highlighting the benefits of the Diesel Emissions

Reduction Act (DERA) funding:
Highlights of the Diesel Emissions Reduction Program  

Tips for a Successful Diesel Retrofit Project
This document is designed to help state, regional, and local governments improve air quality and public health through diesel engine emission reduction efforts, particularly for those states and localities participating in the National Clean Diesel Campaign (NCDC) State Grant Program and/or the National Clean Diesel Funding Assistance Program.

Diesel Retrofits: Quantifying and Using Their Benefits in SIPs and Conformity -- Guidance for State and Local Air and Transportation Agencies (February 2014)
This document provides guidance on quantifying and using emission reductions from highway and nonroad diesel vehicles, engines, and equipment that have been retrofitted. The guidance discusses how emission reductions from diesel retrofit projects can be used in a SIP and in transportation conformity and general conformity determinations, based on the new MOVES methodology described in this guidance.

For a fact sheet and to download the guidance document, please visit: http://www.epa.gov/otaq/stateresources/transconf/policy.htm#retrofit

A Guide to Understanding and Accessing the Congestion Mitigation and Air Quality (CMAQ) Program (Diesel Technology Forum, April 2007)
The CMAQ Program is quite complex, which when added to the variability of its administration from state to state, makes it extremely difficult to assess the process and prospects for competing for these funds. The Diesel Technology Forum, with assistance from the Emissions Control Technology Association, has written this guide to assist those wishing to learn more about the potential funding opportunities available under this program. Includes case studies, insight into CMAQ's administration, and suggestions on how to increase the competitiveness of diesel retrofit applications.

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Diesel Emissions Reduction Technologies

Clean Diesel Truck Video Training
Clean diesel trucks (with 2007 or newer engines) are ten times cleaner than older diesel trucks. But they also have complicated pollution control systems. Understanding how newer trucks and their pollution control systems work is important to avoiding expensive engine repairs. This video training course will guide you through the differences between older diesel trucks and newer, cleaner diesel trucks. It will also show you how to take care of a clean diesel truck.

Locomotive Idle Reduction Options (November, 2011)
Tom Balon, M.J. Bradley and Associates LLC

2014-18 Medium & Heavy Duty Final Rule (presented November, 2011)
Joint Briefing for Congressional Staff 9 August 2011

Non-Road Diesel Engines: Technologies for Reducing Fuel Consumption & Emissions (November, 2011)
Wayne Clark, Milton-CAT

Impacts of Advanced Combustion, Fuels and Aftertreatment Technologies on Diesel PM Emissions
California Air Resources Board
Sacramento, CA
February 11, 2009
This presentation traces the development of diesel engine emissions control technologies since the mid-1990's and provides a vision of future diesel technologies with an emphasis on PM and MSAT emissions.

MARAMA Report on the Mid-Atlantic Truck Engine Idle Reduction Technology Demonstration Program
The Mid-Atlantic Regional Air Management Association (MARAMA) working in partnership with the air quality small business assistance programs in Delaware, Pennsylvania, and Virginia developed the Mid-Atlantic Regional Small Business Anti-Idling Initiative. This effort provided support for the purchase and installation of anti-idling technology by independent truckers and small transport companies that qualify as small businesses (operating less than 50 trucks) located within two Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) Region III states, Delaware and Pennsylvania. The project produced data on the effectiveness of auxiliary power units (APU) in reducing idling emissions.

The Cost-Effectiveness of Heavy-Duty Diesel Retrofits and Other Mobile Source Emission Reduction Projects and Programs (Office of Transportation and Air Quality, U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, May 2007)
The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency's Office of Transportation and Air Quality prepared a report that provides estimates of emissions reductions and cost effectiveness of retrofit technologies and other mobile source measures. The document focuses on CMAQ-eligible projects and encourages agencies to consider cost effectiveness, air quality and health effects when deciding how to invest air quality resources.

Diesel Retrofit Technology: An Analysis of the Cost Effectiveness of Reducing Particulate Matter and Nitrogen Oxides Emissions from Heavy-Duty Nonroad Diesel Engines Through Retrofits (Office of Transportation and Air Quality, U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, May 2007)
The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency's Office of Transportation and Air Quality prepared a technical analysis of the cost effectiveness of retrofitting existing heavy-duty diesel nonroad engines to reduce particulate matter (PM) and nitrogen oxides (NOx). This report demonstrates how nonroad diesel retrofits can be a cost effective strategy for reducing air pollutants. It expands on an earlier analysis and previous technical report on retrofit cost effectiveness by analyzing more nonroad applications and estimating the cost effectiveness of various NOx strategies.

Locomotive and Marine Emission Reduction (October 2006)
Tom Balon, MJ Bradley & Associates

Technical Report: "Diesel Retrofit Technology: An Analysis of the Cost Effectiveness of Reducing Particulate Matter Emissions from Heavy-Duty Diesel Engines Through Retrofits" (EPA420-S-06-002, March 2006)
EPA's Office of Transportation and Air Quality evaluated the costs and emissions benefits of retrofitting school buses, freight trucks and bulldozers with diesel oxidation catalysts (DOCs) and catalyzed diesel particulate filters (CDPFs). EPA calculated that the cost effectiveness for both DOC and CDPF retrofits ranged from $11,100 to $69,000 per ton of particulate matter (PM) reduced for engines in school buses, Class 6&7 heavy-duty highway trucks and Class 8b trucks (commonly used to transport freight long distances). As a nonroad example, DOC retrofits for 250 hp bulldozers ranged from $18,100 to $49,700 per ton of PM reduced. The findings from this study indicate that retrofits can be a cost effective way to reduce air pollution. To access the full report, please visit: http://www.epa.gov/cleandiesel/publications.htm

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Health Effects of Diesel

Update on Diesel Health Issues and EPA Actions (May 21, 2014)
New data published on the health effects of diesel exhaust and EPA recently provided a presentation on these data and EPA's next steps.

EPA National-Scale Assessment of 2002 Air Toxic Emissions (June 2009)
In June 2009, EPA released the results of its national-scale assessment of 2002 air toxics emissions. The purpose of the national-scale assessment is to identify and prioritize air toxics, emission source types and locations which are of greatest potential concern in terms of contributing to population risk.

Health Effects Institute: Extended Follow-Up and Spatial Analysis of the American Cancer Society Study Linking Particulate Air Pollution and Mortality
(May 2009)
Daniel Krewski et al.

Fine-Particulate Air Pollution and Life Expectancy in the United States (January 2009)
C. Arden Pope III, Ph.D., Majid Ezzati, Ph.D., and Douglas W. Dockery, Sc.D.
This article in the New England Journal of Medicine examines exposure to fine-particulate air pollution. Such exposure has been associated with increased morbidity and mortality, suggesting that sustained reductions in pollution exposure should result in improved life expectancy. This study directly evaluated the changes in life expectancy associated with differential changes in fine particulate air pollution that occurred in the United States during the 1980s and 1990s.

Mortality from Ship Emissions: A Global Assessment (October 2007)
An international team of leading researchers, led by Dr. James Corbett of the University of Delaware, USA, and by Dr. James Winebrake of the Rochester Institute of Technology, USA conducted the study released by the American Chemical Society journal, Envirionmental Science & Technology. It was commissioned in part by the Clean Air Task Force with support from the Oak Foundation. The study estimated that the global death toll in 2002 from particulate air pollution emitted by oceangoing ships was some 60,000 premature deaths per year. And the shipping death toll is estimated to grow by 40% by 2012 along with a continued large increase in global trade and shipping traffic. Europe and Asia are particularly affected—about 1/3 of all shipping deaths occur in Europe, and about ¼ in each of East Asia and South Asia.

Ultrafine Particles: Issues Surrounding Diesel Retrofit Technologies for Particulate Matter Control (February, 2007)
Phil Johnson and Paul J. Miller, NESCAUM

Diesel Particulate Filters and Ultrafine Particles (December 2006)
Northeast Diesel Collaborative

Ultrafines from Emission Control Devices: Results from the Real World (October 2006)
Aniket Sawant, Ph.D.
Johnson Matthey Inc.

DPFs—Is There An Ultrafine Problem? CATF's Investigations and Response (October 2006)
L. Bruce Hill Ph.D., Senior Scientist
Clean Air Task Force

The Burden of Asthma in New England (March 2006)
Asthma is a lung disease that, if not treated, can cause permanent lung damage, disability and sometimes even death. An asthma attack is what happens when the airways narrow, in response to a "trigger", making it difficult to breathe. Attacks usually occur in reaction to allergens, certain air pollutants or weather conditions, respiratory illnesses such as a cold or flu, or even stress.

This report highlights how asthma affects adults, children and families living in New England. It is a summary of the results from the National Survey of Children's Health, 2003 and the 2004 Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System.

2005 Research Highlights: Health Effects of Particulate Matter and Ozone Air Pollution (January 2006)
American Lung Association

Evaluating the Occupational and Environmental Impact of Nonroad Diesel Equipment in the Northeast (March 2004)
NESCAUM
This evaluates the potential health risks from nonroad sources by monitoring selected hazardous air pollutant and particulate matter exposures in the cabin of operating nonroad diesel equipment and at the perimeter of the active work site.

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Alternative Fuels

URI/UCONN Biofuels Symposium
Creating a Sustainable Energy Economy in Southern New England
(May 29, 2009)
Presentations of multiple sessions on the development, use and management of biofuels. Sponsored by the University of Rhode Island and the University of Connecticut.

New Hampshire - New Federal/State Requirements for Biodiesel
Concord, NH – The New Hampshire Department of Environmental Services announces that new federal and state requirements for the production and sale of biodiesel in New Hampshire go into effect in December and January. The new requirements are good for the future of biodiesel in the state as they will ensure that this fuel alternative is more readily available and meets stringent fuel quality standards.

Massachusetts Executive Order on Biofuels
The Executive Office for Administration and Finance (A&F) has determined that, given the rising costs of imported oil, the price volatility and infrastructure vulnerability of these imports, the local and global air pollution released, and the millions of dollars spent each year to refuel state vehicles and purchase #2 heating oil for state buildings, and in keeping with the Administration's commitment to long-term cost containment, energy efficiency, improved public health and natural resource conservation, all executive agency vehicle fleets and #2 heating oil boilers should phase in the use of biofuels to replace petroleum-based fuels.

Technical Report: Experimental Trial Using Biodiesel Fuel in Heavy Fleet Vehicles (Maine Department of Transportation - Transportation Research Division, May 2004)
From July 2003 to April 2003, Maine DOT used a blend containing 20% of biodiesel fuel (B20) in five pieces of mobile equipment and in two furnaces at the Freeport Maintenance Facility, in lieu of conventional diesel fuel. This study found that biodiesel costs 40 to 50 cents more per gallon than conventional diesel.

Maine Department of Transportation letter to Transportation Providers
(October 2006)
On October 19, 2006 the Maine Department of Transportation, Office of Passenger Transportation (DOT/OPT) sent a letter to transportation providers in the state advocating the use of biodiesel in diesel powered buses.

States Take the Lead by Developing Alternative Fuel Policies (U.S. Department of Energy, August 2006)
Biofuels incentives in Ohio, state tax credits for truck stop electrification in Washington, a hybrid rebate program in Pennsylvania. A clear trend is emerging and states are becoming key to implementing alternative fuel and advanced transportation policies.

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Construction

Diesel Engine Retrofits in the Construction Industry: A How To Guide
In January 2008, the Massachusetts Department of Environmnental Protection issued a comprehensive "how to" guide for retrofiting diesel construction equipment with advanced pollution control technologies. The 56 page document includes the following: an overview of the health and air quality concerns associated with diesel pollution, the Massachusetts state agency construction retrofit requirements, available retrofit technologies, a retrofit "roadmap", and case studies of successful projects.

Diesel Retrofits: Today and Tomorrow Off-Road Experience (October 2006)
Marty Lassen
Johnson Matthey

Emission Reduction Incentives for Off-Road Diesel Equipment Used in the Port and Construction Sectors (ICF/EPA 2005)
This report describes and assesses incentive programs to reduce emissions from off-road diesel engines used in the construction industry and port sector. The report focuses primarily on grant programs, tax incentives, modified contracting procedures, and non-monetary incentives implemented at the federal, state, regional, and local level.

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Freight

FHWA Talking Freight Seminar Series
The U.S. Department of Transportation Federal Highway Administration hosts monthly net-conference seminars to provide a convenient and no-cost way for transportation practitioners to broaden their freight knowledge base and develop new skills to help them do their jobs better. Visit http://www.fhwa.dot.gov/freightplanning/talking.htm to register for upcoming sessions and see/hear recordings of previous seminars.

Faster Freight - Cleaner Air East Coast Conference
New York City
July 8-10, 2008
The three-day conference featured general sessions, breakout sessions (tracks covering Marine, Rail, On-Road/Trucking, and Off-Road), Expo Hall, and off-site tours of the New York/New Jersey harbor. For the conference agenda and to download presentations, click here.

Short Sea Shipping Symposium
UMass Dartmouth
March 26-27, 2008
This two-day conference provided attendees with a broad overview of domestic Short Sea Shipping. Over 100 representatives from federal, state and local government agencies, consultants, shipping industry representatives, and environmental advocates participated in the discussions.

MARAMA Report on the Mid-Atlantic Truck Engine Idle Reduction Technology Demonstration Program
The Mid-Atlantic Regional Air Management Association (MARAMA) working in partnership with the air quality small business assistance programs in Delaware, Pennsylvania, and Virginia developed the Mid-Atlantic Regional Small Business Anti-Idling Initiative. This effort provided support for the purchase and installation of anti-idling technology by independent truckers and small transport companies that qualify as small businesses (operating less than 50 trucks) located within two Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) Region III states, Delaware and Pennsylvania. The project produced data on the effectiveness of auxiliary power units (APU) in reducing idling emissions.

Compendium of Current State Idling Regulations
The American Transportation Research Institute (ATRI) publishes a compendium of current idling regulations by state, which is provided for free in two different PDF formats -- the original compendium listing and as a foldable cab card for quick reference. ATRI updates the compendium regularly.

Model State Idling Law (April 2006)
To help facilitate more consistent, effective state truck idling laws, EPA has developed a model that states can consider adopting to help strengthen idling reduction efforts, reduce fuel consumption and improve industry compliance. Reducing idling conserves energy, helps the environment and saves industry money. Each year, truck idling consumes over one billion gallons of diesel fuel, resulting in the emission of 11 million tons of carbon dioxide, over 180,000 tons of nitrogen oxides, as well as emission of fine particulate matter and other air toxics. The model is based on input from workshops EPA held across the country in 2005 with the trucking industry, states, and environmental and health groups.

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Rail

Locomotive and Marine Emission Reduction (October 2006)
Tom Balon, MJ Bradley & Associates

Scoping Study to Evaluate Locomotive Emissions Operating in New Haven, Connecticut and Potential Control Options (NESCAUM, June 2006)
The locomotive fleet in and around New Haven, Connecticut includes line-haul freight, commuter, intercity rail, and switch locomotives. To better characterize pollution from locomotives operating in and around New Haven, NESCAUM has developed a preliminary inventory of locomotive emissions in the New Haven area, and has evaluated potential control options to reduce locomotive pollution. This report presents the findings of this work and focuses on emissions in New Haven and Fairfield since most of the rail activity in Connecticut takes place in these two densely populated counties.

New England Rail Expo and Forum - March 28, 2006
The Northeast Diesel Collaborative hosted a special seminar at the 2006 New England Rail Expo & Forum. This seminar examined key issues facing railroad operators today, including new and emerging technologies that can save fuel and reduce emissions, a review of upcoming fuel regulations and their effects on the rail industry in the Northeast, funding opportunities including low interest loans, an examination of New York Container Terminal's choice to use on-dock hybrid locomotives, and the Port Authority of New York & New Jersey's intensive capital redevelopment on-dock and regional rail improvement program. For the seminar agenda and presentations, click here »

New England Railroad Club Meeting - January 26, 2006
The New England Railroad Club and NESCAUM, on behalf of the Northeast Diesel Collaborative, organized a "green technologies" panel for the annual "Mechanical Night" meeting of its members. In early 2006, more than 100 members of the club gathered for a panel on "Saving Fuel and Reducing Emissions with 'Green' Locomotive Technologies" that included presentations on NEDC, fuels and technologies, and a retrofit demonstration project with the Massachusetts Bay Transportation Authority's commuter rail. For conference agenda and presentations, click here.

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Ports/Authorities

Commercial Harbor Craft Regulation Implementation
California Air Resources Board
Sacramento, CA
February 11, 2009
This presentation describes the structure, rules, and exemptions related to the commercial harbor craft regulations that became effective January 1, 2009 for vessels within regulated California waters.

NEDC Goods Movement Work Group
by Guiselle Aldrete
September 17, 2008
This presentation covers lessons learned from ports about various technologies, emission reduction strategies, and what lies ahead for East Coast ports.

EPA New England Options for the Marine Ports Sector: Green Strategies for Sustainable Ports (June 2008)
This document provides marine port authorities and terminal operators with an overview of strategies that can be implemented to reduce air emissions from daily operations. These strategies are organized to provide a tiered approach to "greening port operations" based on cost and existing infrastructure, beginning with low cost/no cost strategies.

Locomotive and Marine Emission Reduction (October 2006)
Tom Balon, MJ Bradley & Associates

Emission Reduction Incentives for Off-Road Diesel Equipment Used in the Port and Construction Sectors (ICF/EPA 2005)
This report describes and assesses incentive programs to reduce emissions from off-road diesel engines used in the construction industry and port sector. The report focuses primarily on grant programs, tax incentives, modified contracting procedures, and non-monetary incentives implemented at the federal, state, regional, and local level.

San Pedro Bay Ports Clean Air Action Plan (2006)
The San Pedro Bay Ports Clean Air Action Plan was developed jointly by the Port of Los Angeles, and the Port of Long Beach. This plan is the first of its kind in the country and seeks to significantly reduce the health risks posed by air pollution from port-related ships, trains, trucks, terminal equipment and harbor craft.

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Transit

New York City Transit (NYCT) Hybrid (125 Order) and CNG Transit Buses
NREL has published the final version of a study comparing 10 new compressed natural gas (CNG) and next-generation diesel series-hybrid electric bus propulsion systems operated at New York City Transit (NYCT) against a baseline of conventional diesel buses. The DOE laboratory report is part of a series of evaluations from NREL that track and evaluate new propulsion systems in transit buses and trucks. The buses evaluated in the study were the original 10 proto-type diesel-hybrid buses from Orion and BAE Systems (model Orion VI buses) operated at NYCT. That evaluation was the subject of a July 2002 report and provided results from the prototype buses from 1998 through 2001. This report focuses on 10 new compressed natural gas (CNG) buses and hybrid propulsion systems. This report describes the evaluation results for new Orion VII low floor buses at NYCT with CNG propulsion (equipped with Detroit Diesel Corporation Series 50G CNG engine) and new hybrid propulsion (equipped with BAE Systems' HybriDrive propulsion system). These final results represent a 12-month evaluation of these two groups of buses (October 2004 through September 2005). The buses evaluated are the same age, the same bus platform, have been operated on similar duty cycles, and experienced similar maintenance practices.

Conclusions of the report include:

  • Hybrid-diesel buses showed an increase of 37 percent in fuel economy compared to standard diesel-powered buses and 88 percent compared to CNG buses.
  • Maintenance costs for hybrids were 5 percent lower than CNG buses.
  • Emissions from the diesel hybrids were 90 percent lower for particulate matter, 40 percent lower for NOx, and 30 percent fewer greenhouse gases.
  • Drivers like the increased torque of the hybrid for help in accelerating and hill climbing.

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Industry/Industry Associations

Biodiesel.org
The official website of the National Biodiesel Board, the national trade association representing the biodiesel industry as the coordinating body for research and development in the United States. You can find information on biodiesel fuels, as well as where to find distribution and retail locations.

Clean Diesel Fuel Alliance
A government, industry and consumer alliance that provides information on ultra-low sulfur diesel fuel.

Clean Diesel Technology Forum
The Diesel Technology Forum works with industry, government officials and unique coalition groups to raise awareness about the economic importance and essential uses of diesel engines.

Emissions Control Technology Association
A trade association that promotes public policies aimed at achieving cleaner air by reducing mobile source emissions through the use of state of the art technologies.

The Manufacturers of Emission Controls Association
A non-profit organization with the mission to provide technical information on emission control technology

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State Agencies, Legislation, and Plans

Connecticut

Connecticut Department of Energy and Environmental Protection – Bureau of Air Management

Connecticut Clean School Bus Legislation (2007): Effective July 1, 2007, the Connecticut legislature passed a bill, SB1500, requiring school buses statewide to be retrofitted with advanced pollution control devices no later than September 1, 2010. However, subsection (b) of section 17 states, "The provisions of subsection (a) of this section shall not apply if the procurement contracts developed pursuant to subsection (c) of this section fail to establish a price level for the purchase, installation and warranty of a closed crankcase filtration system, and either a level 1device, level 2 device or level 3 device in each type of full-sized school bus that is equivalent to or less than the grant amount for such emissions control device specified in subsection (a) of section 19 of this act."

Connecticut Clean Diesel Plan: On June 24, 2005, Governor Rell signed Special Act 05-07 requiring DEP to develop a diesel mitigation plan for submission to the General Assembly by January 15, 2006. Special Act 05-07 directs the DEP to develop a clean diesel mitigation strategy that will reduce fine particulate matter diesel emissions in the state.

Maine

Maine Department of Environmental Protection – Bureau of Air Quality

Massachusetts

Massachusetts Department of Environmental Protection

New Hampshire

New Hampshire Department of Environmental Services – Air Resources Division

New Hampshire Diesel Emissions Reduction Workshop
On April 7, the NH Department of Environmental Services and the Northeast Diesel Collaborative hosted a one-day workshop on strategies, tools, technologies, and incentives for reducing diesel emissions at universities, hospitals, and municipalities throughout the state. The workshop featured panel discussions on topics including: retrofits, idle reduction programs, alternative/cleaner fuels, permitting, voluntary incentives, and funding opportunities for diesel emissions reductions.

New Jersey

New Jersey Department of Environmental Protection

New Jersey Diesel Law:
On September 7, 2005, then Acting Governor Codey signed into law a bill that would establish a program to cut exposure to harmful diesel soot emissions in school buses and to reduce diesel soot from garbage trucks, transit buses and publicly owned on-road and off-road diesel vehicles and equipment. On November 8, 2005, voters approved Ballot Question #2, a constitutional amendment that will fund the diesel program and will be paid for with a portion of revenue from the existing Corporate Business Tax

New York

New York Department of Environmental Conservation – Division of Air Resources

Puerto Rico

Puerto Rico Environmental Quality

Puerto Rico NEDC Committee

Rhode Island

Rhode Island Department of Environmental Management – Office of Air Resources

Rhode Island Diesel Emissions Reduction Workshop
On March 28, the RI Department of Environmental Management and the Northeast Diesel Collaborative hosted a one-day workshop on strategies, tools, technologies, and incentives for reducing diesel emissions at universities, hospitals, and municipalities throughout the state. The workshop featured panel discussions on topics including: retrofits, idle reduction programs, alternative/cleaner fuels, permitting, voluntary incentives, and funding opportunities for diesel emissions reductions.

US Virgin Islands

U.S.VI Division of Environmental Protection

Vermont

Vermont Department of Environmental Conservation – Air Quality and Climate Division

 

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Regional and Local Initiatives

Blue Skyways Collaborative: A public-private collaboration aimed at reducing air pollution in the central United States.

Clean Air Communities: A non-profit entity committed to implementing air pollution reduction and energy efficiency strategies in low-income New York City communities that are disproportionately affected by air pollution

Greater Boston Breathes Better (GB3): An EPA launched partnership among government, the private sector, institutions and non profit organizations with the goal of improving Boston's air quality by reducing air pollution, including air toxics from transportation sources in the Boston area.

Mid-Atlantic Diesel Collaborative: A new regional effort to reduce diesel related emissions in the Mid-Atlantic region

Mid-West Clean Diesel Initiative: A public-private partnership to reduce diesel emissions from diesel engines in the Midwest.

NESCAUM: The Northeast States for Coordinated Air Use Management is a nonprofit organization that represents the interests of the air quality agencies of the eight northeastern states

Rocky Mountain Clean Diesel Collaborative: A partnership of federal, state and local governments, non-profit organizations, the private sector, and environmental groups in Colorado, Montana, North Dakota, South Dakota, Utah and Wyoming to reduce diesel emissions.

Southeast Diesel Collaborative: A voluntary, public-private partnership to reduce diesel emissions from existing engines and equipment in Alabama, Florida, Georgia, Kentucky, Mississippi, North Carolina, South Carolina and Tennessee.

US Environmental Protection Agency Region 1: Serving Connecticut, Maine, Massachusetts, New Hampshire, Rhode Island, Vermont and 10 Tribal Nations.

US Environmental Protection Agency Region 2: Serving New Jersey, New York, Puerto Rico and the US Virgin Islands

West Coast Collaborative: A public-private partnership working to reduce air pollution emissions from diesel sources along the West Coast.

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National Initiatives

Clean Cities: A U.S. Department of Energy program aimed at advancing the nation's economic, environmental, and energy security by supporting local decisions to adopt practices that contribute to the reduction of petroleum consumption, such as alternative fuels and vehicles, fuel blends, fuel economy, hybrid vehicles, and idle reduction.

Clean Ports USA: Clean Ports USA is an EPA National Voluntary Initiative to reduce emissions from land-based diesel equipment operating at ports.

Clean School Bus USA: Clean School Bus USA is an EPA program aimed at reducing both children's exposure to diesel exhaust and the amount of air pollution created by diesel school buses.

Congestion Mitigation Air Quality (CMAQ) Funds: The U.S. Department of Transportation's CMAQ program provides funds to state DOTs, MPOs, and transit agencies to invest in projects that reduce air pollution from transportation-related sources.

Construction Air Quality Language: This web site resource is a compilation of language used in contracts, codes, laws, rules and other measures for addressing air quality issues, particularly diesel emissions, from construction equipment and other diesel sources.

National Clean Diesel Campaign: EPA has created the National Clean Diesel Campaign to reduce the pollution emitted from diesel engines across the country through varied control strategies and the aggressive involvement of national, state, and local partners.

SmartWay Vehicles: EPA's SmartWaySM program offers great options for drivers and shoppers who want to make greener choices when it comes to transportation.

When you buy a SmartWay certified vehicle or fill up with a renewable fuel like E85, you are helping to reduce air pollution and improve energy efficiency. It's the smart way to make an important contribution to a cleaner environment and our energy independence.

Smartway Transport: The SmartWaySM Transport Partnership is a voluntary partnership between EPA and the freight industry designed to increase energy efficiency and significantly reduce greenhouse gases and air pollution by adopting fuel-saving strategies that increase profits and reduce emissions.

US EPA's Retrofit Verification Program: The objective of the Voluntary Diesel Retrofit Program Verification Process is to introduce verified technologies to the market as cost effectively as possible, while providing customers with confidence that verified technologies will provide emission reductions as advertised.

US EPA's Voluntary Diesel Retrofit Program: EPA has developed the Voluntary Diesel Retrofit Program to address pollution from diesel construction equipment and heavy-duty vehicles that are on the road today.

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NEDC Resources

National Clean Diesel Campaign Policy Leaders Summit (December 2005)
Robert W. Varney, Regional Administrator
EPA New England

Northeast Diesel Collaborative Presentation to Ozone Transportation Commission (November 2005)
Arthur Marin, NESCAUM

Northeast Diesel Collaborative Overview (August 2005)

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